Monday, February 14, 2011

WINE INSTITUTE PUSHES CALIFORNIA WINE WORLDWIDE


Wine Institute

California's Wine Institute has launched a campaign to brand California's wines globally.  It would seem at first blush an unnecessary move, since California is the world's fourth largest wine producer and makes 90% of all U.S. wines which are exported.  American wine, to most around the world, is California wine.

The idea is to make a good thing even better.  Wine Insitute wants to double California's wine exports by 2022.  That would put the annual dollar figure at just about $2 billion.

They are rolling out the Discover California Winescampaign to "put a face" on wines from the Golden State for the rest of the world.  Americans who learn a little bit about the geography, terrain and people of wine producing countries around the world get a better understanding of those wines and, in turn, buy them more often.  Wine Institute hopes it works the other way, too.

The campaign starts with a colorful logo, which resembles the artwork of the old orange crates of California's yesteryear.  Striated golden sunshine and green vineyards emanate from behind a silhouetted wine bottle, reaches out to all points.

The campaign will connect the California wine industry to visual imagery of our wine regions, with colorful maps and pictures of our vineyards and landmarks.

California wine will get a high profile around the world, as the Discover California Wines campaign takes the message to trade fairs in Düsseldorf, London and Bordeaux.  The tour will also include California Wine Fairs in Canada and the California Wines European Spring Tour.

It's been pointed out by many that people in countries other than the United States tend to drink their own wines, not California's.  Weaning the French away from Bordeaux and Burgundy won't be easy; I'm sure Wine Institute doesn't feel California can corner the global market on wine.  They do feel, though, that it's worth a shot to try and at least cut California's slice of the worldwide wine pie a little bigger.